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- Aug 23, 2018

Please allow 4-6 weeks for processing of documents submitted to us in late July and August.
All charges must be paid in full by 5pm on Friday, August 24th.


Options for covering tuition and fees include:
  1. Add the installment plan to divide your bill in to four equal amounts, with the first installment payment due on Friday, August 24th. The charge to add the installment plan is $15. If you do not pay the first installment, a late fee will be added. More information at https://sbs.tamu.edu/accounts-billing/payment-refunds/installments/.
  2. Apply for an Emergency Tuition and Fees Loan at https://sfaid.tamu.edu/stlapp/. This loan can cover 100% of your tuition and fees. It must be repaid within 90 days. After you apply, you will receive an approval email to your TAMU email account within one business day. The email will include instructions on signing the promissory note online. After the promissory note is signed, the ETFL will apply to your bill immediately and pay your tuition and fees.



- Jul 09, 2018

Identity theft scams are on the rise! Scholarships & Financial Aid will never contact you and ask you to provide your full social security number or passwords to accounts. Always use caution when conducting business over the phone or email. Utilize the secure Financial Aid Portal through howdy.tamu.edu to get information on your financial aid account, whenever possible.

If you are contacted about your personal information regarding financial aid and you are in doubt, don't answer any questions! Hang up and call our office directly at 979.845.3236 or email us at financialaid@tamu.edu.
 



- Apr 30, 2018

“What is a mutual fund?” Sam Rogers asked his financial literacy class.

Tessa Sabin, an 11th grader at Riverton High School, offered a guess: “Isn’t it where you invest in something that’s invested in multiple things? So that if one of them tanks, it doesn’t affect you overall because your investment is spread around.”

Rogers throws a lollipop to her for answering correctly. This kind of question is normal in Utah high schools, where financial literacy is a core requirement to graduate. Five states in the U.S. earn an A grade from Champlain College’s Center for Financial Literacy when it comes to teaching personal finance in high school, but only Utah has gotten an A+.

To view the full article, visit https://finance.yahoo.com/news/one-state-gets-teaching-students-money-161046576.html.



- Apr 24, 2018

"The scholarship provided to me by The Association of Former Students through your generous support has not only been an immense gift for me, but for my family as well. When I first received word of the scholarship, it gave me hope that achieving a college education was a possibility. You have provided me with the opportunity to achieve my dreams of becoming a mechanical engineer in hopes of providing a better future for my current and future family. I hope to one day be able to give back to the university that has given so much to me. Thank you so much."

-Jose Godoy '19

To view the full article, visit https://www.aggienetwork.com/spotlight/.



- Apr 23, 2018

Millennials have to endure many stereotypes. They are often labeled lazy, entitled and even narcissistic.

Zach Swartz, an older millennial himself and portfolio manager with BKD Wealth Advisors in Springfield, Missouri, isn't sure the generation really deserves to be singled out in that way. "Sometimes millennials can be painted as very different from other generations when they're not," he says.

Case in point: the money management mistakes commonly made by millennials. The following six mistakes aren't so different from the financial gaffes made by older adults.

To view the full article, visit https://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/family-finance/articles/2018-03-02/6-money-management-mistakes-millennials-often-make



- Apr 20, 2018

"Jamie McKnight, 35, a mother of two, filed her federal tax return in late January, expecting to get a roughly $9,700 refund that would help her pay for rent, health care expenses and other bills," USA Today reports. "What the Kingston, N.Y., resident didn't anticipate was that nothing would show up in her bank account."

"McKnight soon discovered that the government had seized the money to apply to her overdue student loans, which she said total roughly $20,000. She says she didn't know the loans were in default, or that the feds could repay the debt with her refund.

'I waited for it to hit my account, and nothing happened,' she said. 'It's frustrating because this was supposed to be our safety net.'

To view the full article, visit https://www.nasfaa.org/news-item/14941/Tax_Refund_Got_You_Excited_Don_t_Count_On_it_If_Your_Student_Loans_Are_in_Default



- Apr 19, 2018

April is Financial Literacy Month. You might suspect there is a problem with financial literacy in America, if an entire month is dedicated to it! And you would be right.

April is an opportune time to look at three efforts that may have a chance to combat financial illiteracy. These are chosen because of their scalability and capacity to make a real difference for financial literacy in America.

To view the full article, visit https://www.forbes.com/sites/pensionresearchcouncil/2016/04/01/happy-financial-literacy-month/#76bcb852e213



- Apr 18, 2018

Students preparing to begin college and take more control over their personal finances in many cases lack the skills and knowledge to make responsible financial decisions and repay their student loans, according to a new survey from EverFi.

The survey collected data from a nationally representative sample of more than 100,000 incoming college students — most from four-year institutions — in more than 410 institutions across the country. Overall, the survey found that most respondents struggled to answer basic financial literacy questions, and on average only answered two of six questions correctly.

To view the full article, visit https://www.nasfaa.org/news-item/14855/Survey_Incoming_College_Students_Struggle_With_Basic_Financial_Literacy.



- Apr 17, 2018

It’s truly an honor to stand by your friend’s side as she exchanges vows with her beloved and takes her first steps toward marital bliss. If only those precious moments could make up for the exorbitant costs that come with being a part of her special day.

Members of the wedding party spend an average of $728 on gifts, travel and attire for the wedding, bachelor or bachelorette party and shower, according to a new Bankrate report.

The average price varies depending on where you live. Northeastern wedding party members should be prepared to shell out even more than that, with an average all-in cost of $1,070 to participate in all three events.

While those figures may be eye-boggling, it’s actually an extremely conservative estimate.

To view the full article, visit https://finance.yahoo.com/news/much-americans-spend-attend-wedding-100053961.html.



- Apr 16, 2018

 Almost time to start paying back your student loans?  Contrary to popular belief, your student loan payments don’t have to stop you from living your life. You just have to weigh your options and find a strategy that works within your budget. Here are some steps to get you started.

To view the full article, visit https://blog.ed.gov/2016/04/5-must-dos-before-repaying-your-student-loans/?sf86459059=1


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